Send 1 RoseA single rose says it so much better!

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We now offer single Preserved Roses too

Saturday, February 8th, 2014

Exciting news! You can now also order a single preserved rose from our eBay store.

These preserved roses are 100% natural and have been “suspended” in time when freshly-cut to look vibrant for years with the correct care.

You can order a single preserved rose of your choice below.

Available Roses

Sunday, December 16th, 2012
Order a Single Rose Now!

Here is some information about all our available Roses. (Please note, roses are seasonal and subject to availability, and all colors may not be available at time of ordering)

NEW We now also offer long-life single Preserved Roses as an alternative.

According to the Victorian “Language of flowers”, different colored roses each have their own symbolic meaning:

  • Red: love
  • Pink: grace, gentle feelings of love
  • Dark Pink: gratitude
  • Light Pink: admiration, sympathy
  • White: innocence, purity, secrecy, friendship, reverence and humility
  • Yellow: Yellow roses generally mean dying love or platonic love. In German-speaking countries, however, they can mean jealousy and infidelity
  • Yellow with red tips: friendship, falling in love
  • Orange: passion
  • Burgundy: beauty
  • Blue: mystery
  • Green: calm
  • Black: slavish devotion (as a true black rose is impossible to produce)
  • Purple: protection (paternal/maternal love)

(Read more)

At Send1Rose.com we use this universal symbolism in our choice of Roses, and only send a single Rose that denotes “simplicity”, a simple message. But, to avoid misinterpretation by the recipient, we always suggest making its meaning clear in the enclosed Note (if available).

The following are our normal range of Roses, but the selection may differ from time to time, depending on availability. You will be able to select from available Roses during checkout.


Single Red Rose
The most meaningful flower of all is considered to be the red rose. A single red rose is now usually used to send a message of love.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • I love you
  • Love, respect, beauty


Single White Rose
– A single white rose is used by someone that wants to say ‘I’m sorry’ to his/her significant other. It also has some other meanings. Since medieval times white roses are considered to be a symbol of light, purity and innocence, so sending a single white rose may also mean that you consider that person to be pure, or that your love is very pure.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • I am worthy of you
  • Innocence, purity, humility, secrecy, silence


Single Peach Rose
– A single peach rose is used to send a message of friendship to a best friend or even to a lover.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • Immortality
  • Modesty


Single Yellow Rose
– A single yellow rose expresses happiness and love. Sending a single yellow rose to your half means that you are happy with your love and relationship. But be careful because single yellow roses may have two meanings! They can also express jealousy, so sending someone one can mean that you are jealous. The best thing to do is to attach a note to the rose, explaining exactly what you mean.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • Jealousy
  • Joy, friendship


Single Purple Rose
– A single purple rose expresses beauty. So if you want to tell someone he/she is beautiful send him/her a single purple rose.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • Protection (paternal/maternal love)
  • Fallen in love at first sight


Single Pink Rose
– A single pink rose is an elegant way of thanking someone because this is what pink roses transmit: gratitude.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • Perfect happiness, secret love, grace & sweetness, indecision
  • Dark pink: thankfulness
  • Pale pink: grace, joy


Single Black Rose*
– A single black rose says ‘it is over’. This is a way of ending a relationship – sending a single black rose together with a note.

Victorian “Language of flowers” meanings:

  • Dark crimson: mourning


*Please note, a true black rose is impossible to produce, but there are some of such a deep red as to suggest black. e.g., Rosa ‘Black Magic’. We try and use a Rose as “black” as possible. As for the meaning? There is some disagreement on this point. Many say black represents death and can thus be used as a symbol to express vengeance towards a foe, or the ending of a relationship. But others interpret that more liberally, suggesting as a meaning for black roses the death of old habits, thus signalling rebirth. The best, when sending a Black Rose, is to express your intended meaning in the free Note Card.


Valentine's RoseOrdering for Valentine’s Day? Here are more modern meanings associated with Roses:

  • Red roses mean romantic love; they’re the “Valentine roses,” par excellence.
  • Purple, coral and orange challenge red as the color for Valentine roses. The rose color meanings for these 3 are as follows:
    • The specific purpose of purple roses is to signify that the giver has fallen in love with the recipient at first sight.
    • Meanwhile, coral and orange roses signal desire.
  • The meaning of yellow roses is joy and friendship.
  • We express our gratitude and appreciation with pink roses….
  • While feelings of admiration and sympathy find words with roses that are light pink in color.
  • Peach is more ambiguous, as it can signify either sympathy or gratitude.
  • Their purity naturally enough lends to white roses the meaning of reverence and humility.

More about Valentine’s Day.

Looking for inspiration? Have a look at our Rose Poetry, Quotes and Sayings!

If you’re ready to order, just click here. Your lucky recipient will have your Rose in no time!

(For more rose care advice visit our sister site, Rose Advice)

Fresh Cut Rose Care

Sunday, December 16th, 2012

Here are some tips to make your fresh cut Rose last longer:

  • Immediately on receipt, open the box and give your Rose attention. If you cannot attend to your Rose immediately, open the box and place it in a cool dark place until you can take a few moments to properly care for it. Place it in the refrigerator (NOT freezer) if you have space.
  • Start by filling a clean vase (disinfected, as germs kill flowers) with water to which a good floral preservative has been added. Using it as recommended will provide additional days of vase life. Avoid using water from a water softener.
  • Remove any leaves that may be under water to prevent decay. When removing leaves and thorns, do not cut through the green bark. Air can enter the water conducting passages through the injuries and restrict water uptake. Bacteria in the water can clog stems.
  • While holding the stem under water in a sink or under running water, cut about one inch off with a sharp knife or shears (preferably disinfected also). DO NOT let the newly cut end dry off before transferring it back to your arrangement or other container. (You only have about two seconds to do this!)
  • Immediately after the stem is cut, place your Rose in a deep vase of warm preservative solution (about 100 degrees F). If possible, leave it in a cool dark room or refrigerator to “condition” for 2 or 3 hours before arranging.
  • If a florist’s porous foam material is used in assembling the arrangement, it is important that it is thoroughly saturated in advance in water containing a floral preservative. Use a vase large enough to keep the entire block of foam submerged. Be sure that the Rose stem is inserted firmly well below the solution level in the container. Do not move the stem end after inserting it into the foam. This may leave an air pocket at the base of the stem.
  • When you arrange it, do not let the Rose lie out on a table. Keep it in your conditioning vase until you place it in your arrangement.
  • Display your fresh cut Rose arrangement in a cool area out of direct sunlight and drafts. Keep your Rose away from the heating and air vents and also never set it on a TV.
  • Roses are thirsty flowers. It is important to check to see that the vase is full and add preservative solution often. Be sure foam materials are completely saturated and the container is full daily.
  • Premature wilting is not a sign that the Rose is old. It usually indicates that air is entrapped in the stem and the preservative solution cannot flow properly up the stem. The end of the stem may be blocked, or look for a cut or scrape in the bark above the water level. Recut the stem above the injured section and then submerge the entire Rose in a basin or shallow pan of warm water (about 100 degrees F). Be sure to keep the stem and head straight. Some florists recommend shaking the Rose gently under water until air bubbles come out of the Rose head. It will usually revive within an hour and can be replaced in the arrangement.
  • Every three days, empty the water, wash your vase, cut the Roses as suggested and put back into the vase as before.

Don’t have floral preservative? Try this recipe (at your own risk):

Add to 1 quart water: 2 tbs. fresh lemon juice, 1 tbs. white sugar 1/2 tsp. household bleach

Or, according to some (use at your own risk), if you run out of flower food, simply add a few tablespoons of 7-UP or Sprite to the water. These beverages contain citric acid which is one of the ingredients contained in a package of flower food.

For more fresh cut flower care and preservation tips, please visit Floral Preservatives. We also have some great general rose care advice at our companion website, Rose Advice.


*Delivery options, seasonal and other restrictions apply. Subject to change without notice, availability & our TOS